Finally Getting Round to Moving My Raspberry Canes

raspcanes

It really is a lovely feeling to finally get a job done that you’ve been meaning to do for ages.

Yesterday, I moved my raspberries. They’re an Autumn fruiting variety, so March is entering last chance saloon stage for any planting or relocation of canes.

Now is also the time to cut old canes back to the ground to allow for Summer growth, so it was a weight off my gardening mind to get this task licked.

Many growing guides will advise that Autumn raspberry canes don’t need any support, but I’d disagree. They can grow okay without help, but I find that the canes can get quite unruly, and end up taking over parts of the plot.

This is the main reason I’ve decided to move mine. Initially, I thought the canes would make a lovely feature against the outside of my greenhouse, but they began to grow outwards and ended up getting in the way of my route around the adjacent raised beds.

So I’ve cleared a nice bed against a fence that is the new home for half a dozen of my raspberry canes. I’ve banged in some new posts and will control the tidiness with wire so that I can still get access to my shed!

Autumn Fruiting Varieties
I now grow far more Autumn raspberries than Summer varieties, as I’ve found the Autumn types, such as Polka and Autumn Bliss, to be much bigger and more productive. Autumn raspberries are a real treat too, and they’ll often still be harvestable until November. They freeze well as well, so if you can’t keep up pop them in a bag and save for Winter.

Shade Tolerant
Raspberries will also tolerate part shade, which is another reason I’ve moved them next to the fence. They will be next to three rhubarb crowns, another plant this doesn’t mind some shade. The rhubarb has grown well, so I’m hoping the raspberry will also prove a good use of this tricky space, especially since the canes will also benefit from the shelter of the fence.

Purchasing and Planting Out
You can plant raspberries at any time during the dormant season, between November and March. This will give them time to establish for the coming Summer. Make sure you give the soil some improver, such as compost or manure but don’t add anything too rich as this can damage young shoots. Avoid planting out any canes when the soil is waterlogged too.

If you’re thinking of buying some raspberries for your allotment or veg patch, you’ll be able to choose between canes available as either bare root or in containers. Plant out both types between November and March.

I’ve planted my canes about 18 inches apart, which I’ve found to be a wide enough distance to allow the raspberries room to breathe, and also enough to make efficient use of allotment space.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.